#ThankfulThursday: Reflections Upon My First and Second “Tours” of Walter Reed

If you remember, I had written for our Memorial Day article mentioning about a family member receiving treatment at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. Now that my family member made it “official” on social media that they are being treated for cancer, I think it is safe to say (at least), that the family member I was referring to all this time is my brother. I just returned from a “second tour” of two weeks (last time I stayed a little over three weeks in May), and I am still amazed and inspired. I wanted to take a moment to share a slice of what I had learned during my most recent trip there.

As always, the medical and support staff at Walter Reed are phenomenal. I feel that my words do not reflect how much I admire and respect all that they do at the hospital for active military and veterans. The medical team working with my brother has been diligent (sometimes over-diligent, but that’s okay). He is still not affected by nausea from the chemo (thank goodness for those newer anti-emetics!) However, he was more fatigued this time around (and lost more hair). Seeing him this way was kind of hard for me. What had kept me up was his attitude through it all. He has kept a positive attitude and, whenever he would go in for an appointment (for the infusion, labs or follow-up with the doctor) he would be like, “Let’s do this!” I am very happy and grateful for the way he has been handling this.

Like last time, we were staying at the Fisher House. This time, however, were a different mix of patients from my last visit. I spoke to a few of them and listened to some of their stories. Between their stories and the stories of my brother, I got a glimpse of active military life. There was one man who was there with his mother – I am going to call him “Joe.” When we – my brother and I – first saw him, he looked like anyone else, except that he was visibly missing the right half of his head. I was amazed that he was able to stand, walk and speak pretty well. Later, when I struck up a conversation over breakfast with him and his mother, and I learned a lot more about him.

About 13 years ago, his convoy was hit by an IED (that’s Improvised Explosive Device). The shock and shrapnel hit him in his head. One of the people in his unit refused to leave without him, despite others telling them to “just go.” He wasn’t expected to survive the night. He was flown to a hospital in Germany, where his mother met up with him. He was alive, but still wasn’t expected to survive very long. He was stabilized and brought to Walter Reed. I am not sure what happened next (they skipped that part of the story), but eventually, he did awaken and was in a wheelchair at first. His medical team remade part of his skull with a plastic-like polymer, so his brain could still be protected (of course). They are here now because that polymer “shield” had gotten infected and they had to remove it. Now, they are preparing to put a titanium one in its place.

Joe can still understand what you are saying and he can keep up in a conversation. Sometimes, if you mention something that strikes a memory in him, he will tell you. He said that his neurologist uses him as an example for his lectures at the teaching hospital. They think that his brain made new connections to compensate for what is lost. He learned to walk on a therapy horse, because their hips move similar to ours when they walk. I then learned that he is blind in his left eye and doesn’t see very well in his right. Sometimes, he has to walk with one arm on his Mother for guidance. He still remembers music/songs that he likes and is re-learning to play the bass guitar (again, I was amazed because the right-side of the brain supposedly controls creativity and music appreciation). The one blessing in all of this, is that he has kept a positive attitude, despite all that had happened. Yes, he had been frustrated at times when he couldn’t do or remember something. No signs of depression or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) either. Otherwise, he has been pretty happy, he said that he would still enlist, even after knowing that this would happen.

Hearing from their experiences has given me more perspective on things. There were times I would feel down and hopeless. Yet, my brother and Joe still maintained a positive attitude, despite what they are going through. I am definitely inspired and I am humbled by their experiences.

So, my dear reader, I hope that my short story gave you some inspiration and perspective. Again, I realize there are times where we feel overwhelmed and stressed with the tasks of daily living. It may help to try and take a deep breath, then think to ourselves, “This is only temporary; this will come to pass.” Also, it would help to remember that keeping a positive attitude while weathering the current storm can help us emotionally and physically in the end (ex: less stress, less strain on the heart, less emotional toll). I am also a big fan of “talking it out,” because sometimes, by saying it out loud, it helps with the problem’s “release.” Plus, you may get some needed advice and guidance from the person you are discussing this with. There are also crisis hotlines available that one can call or even text – some depending on your area, but most are nationwide. The National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) has a list of crisis lines available (in Chicago, they are listed here: http://namichicago.org/en/crisis-lines/), which includes the Suicide Prevention Hotline as well (1-800-273-TALK).

Is there someone that you know or met in your life that gave you as much inspiration as Joe and my Brother had given me? Feel free to share in the comment box below!

–Maeven

Meal Prep Monday:  Pressure Cooker Beef and Bone Soup

“One of my favorite soups for when the cooler weather hits…”

With the change of weather, people all around are sniffling and sneezing.  I couldn’t afford to get sick either.  So, other than taking a bunch of Vitamin C every day, and drinking my green tea, I made one of my favorite soups.

I tried getting oxtails for this, but the store did not have any at the time.  So, I bought some short ribs, marrow bones and beef shanks for the protein.  I also picked up a bag of soup vegetables that included carrots, potatoes, celery, parsnips, an onion, and a turnip.  I also diced some garlic cloves.

I set my pressure cooker to saute so I can brown the meat (it adds more flavor).  While that was heating up, I seasoned the meat with salt and pepper.  I also smothered some tomato paste onto the marrow bones.  The marrow bones add more flavor and richness to the broth.

I melted a tablespoon of coconut oil (or you can use olive oil) in the pressure cooker, and then added the meat.  Once the meat was browned, I added the garlic and chopped onion.  Once the garlic and onion became glossy, I added the beef broth (for more flavor).  I set the pressure cooker for 35 minutes.

At this point, let it cool completely, place the inner pot into the refrigerator until the fat solidifies on the top.  Once it does, remove the fat and reheat the pot in the pressure cooker.  I set it on saute for about 20 minutes.  Once the broth returns to liquid, add the rest of the vegetables and a bay leaf.  Then reset to Pressure cook for at least 30 to 45 minutes.

Ideally, you would let the flavors marry over a day or so.  If not, its still alright – its still yummy!
-Maeven

Ingredients:

4 cloves of garlic

1 chopped onion

1 turnip, cubed

2 parsnips, cut

3 small red potatoes, cleaned and diced

2 celery stalks, cut

1-16 oz can of cannelloni beans, drained and rinsed

1-32 oz container of beef broth

2 bay leaves

This meal was inspired by the following recipes:

http://nomnompaleo.com/post/34093639615/pressure-cooker-porcini-and-tomato-beef-short-ribs

http://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/toasted-garlic-beef-stock

Thirsty Thursday: It’s National Coffee Day!!

How did you celebrate National Coffee Day?

It’s no secret that Justine, Maeven, and I LOOOVE our food. And that includes our coffee!! Of course, we here at Eat Play Chicago LA will not let this day go by without sharing with you guys how we celebrated this awesome holiday.

Justine’s cup of joe:

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Justine went to Krispy Kreme with the two kiddos for coffee and donuts. Coffee is life and everything, but just look at how yummy those Halloween donuts look!

Maeven’s cup of joe:


Look at how beautiful Maeven’s Cafe Latte is from La Colombe in Andersonville, Chicago.

Jaja’s cup of joe:


As for me, I spent the afternoon at my makeshift “blogger’s office” at Starbucks to enjoy my venti Iced coffee paired with vanilla bean scones.

How did you spend National Coffee day, our fellow coffee enthusiasts? Let us know! Have a nice day and enjoy that cup everyone! As a small reminder, make sure to carry with you a reusable cup to help the environment a little, not just to day but as often as you can remember.

-Jaja (@theforevertourist)

 

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Welcome, everybody! Thank you for stopping by and checking out EatPlayChicagoLA, a blog and social media collective about places to explore in the Chicago and Los Angeles area. We will also try to cover topics about lifestyle, travel, food, and everything in between – wherever we find ourselves to be. Please feel free to follow our little brainchild, and we hope that you enjoy our content!

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