Wanderlust Wednesday: Washington, D.C. (Part 3)

We started off at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.  I felt that it is one of the many places to visit while in D.C.  The Holocaust was just an unspeakable and horrible period in the World’s history, yet it is also something that should be reflected and learned about so it is not repeated.

You may think that you know all there is about the Holocaust, but I learned some new things while at the museum – either that or I learned about it, forgot about it then re-learned it again.   For example, other than incarcerating Jews, the Germans also sent Jehovah’s Witnesses, political prisoners (aka anyone who spoke up against Hitler and the Nazis), scientists and homosexuals.  At one point, the amount of countries that were controlled by the Nazis were so far and vast, those trying to escape them, really had no where to go.  Then, once the war was over, because there was so much destruction, especially in the Allied countries, those that were able to return, couldn’t.

They did have stories that I did remember and/or read about.  They had a section on Anne Frank, about her life, when she was captured and when she died.  They also had a section on Auschwitz, how the prisoners were transported by freight cars in extreme conditions.  Then how they were divided up, first by gender, then whether they will continue at the camp undergoing hard labor, or if they will go to the gas chamber.

They also had a room that had written excerpts as well as recordings of those who had survived the Holocaust.  They described how they were brought to the camps, how their life was while living in the barracks, or how it was when they were rescued at the end of the war.  After seeing how everyone was taken, imprisoned and/or put to death, you can’t help but to feel awe for those who had lived through such horror, anger for those who had imprisoned them, and sadness for those who did not survive.

Now, I wish I could have taken more photos around the museum.  However, I also felt that this was such a somber and heavy topic, that I did not want to be snapping photos at every turn.   You can’t help but to feel affected in some way after that.

Next was the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum.   Just like the name suggests, this museum chronicles how man got into the air and space by craft.

We saw the plane flown by the Wright Brothers!

The museum gave a nod to women pilots in America, too!

Some military planes and drones…

As well as space craft and satellites…

We even got on one of the simulator rides!

From there we headed towards the White House.  We were only able to take a picture from outside the gates.

Shortly after we returned home, they announced that they were no longer allowing people in that area anymore (good thing we went, then!)

Finally, our last stop was at the State Capitol.  We were able to get a tour after contacting our state representative, Tammy Duckworth.

For a big building, we weren’t allowed into a lot of it.  Even though there were some rooms there for the representatives, they really spend most of their time across the street in either the Rayburn House Office Building or in the Hart Senate Office Building.

By the time we were done with our tour, we were plenty tired!  We would be leaving early the next morning.   I did feel like we covered a lot of ground and we would love to come back!

How about you?  Have you been here as well?  What did you think?  Feel free to share in the comments below!

Until next time,







CFA’s Favorite NW Suburban Coffee Spots


The thing about coffee is that there is hardly any breathing room between Starbucks and the closest Dunkin. Shoot, there’s hardly enough breathing room between Starbucks and the next Starbucks! Same goes for Dunkin. And I’ll admit – I have the app for both. Because I’m a sucker for racking up rewards.

But I’d say in the past 2 years, I’ve learned to stop pulling into the convenient drive thrus and pay attention to the quality of the coffee. Quick shout out to my cousin, who happens to be a contributor on atribecalledepicurious – he graciously donated a Moka pot to me, and it fueled my obsession. But more on the world of homemade coffee & caffeine variations another time.

I’m not about to invite you all into my home just yet. We’re not cool like that. I can’t let you see how “human” I truly am. For now, just believe me when I say my kids do not leave their toys ANYWHERE that isn’t a restricted play area, my laundry is always done & folded & put away, and we only use our finest non-plastic china to serve homemade, organic breakfast, lunch, and dinner. I mean, you don’t know me, so you have to just take my word for it. I swear.

Continue reading “CFA’s Favorite NW Suburban Coffee Spots”

Musings on the Getty Center and Museums in General,

Hello, everyone! Jaja the forever tourist is here again!  Today, I wanna share with you guys one of my favorite places to explore in the city, the Getty Center.

A quick history: The Getty Center is one of two campuses of the Getty Museum. The Center is located in Brentwood, Los Angeles, while the Getty Villa is in the neighborhood of Pacific Palisades. The art collection was started by Jean Paul Getty in his home in Palisades. As the collection grew, he added a wing to his home which became the museum area, displaying his extensive collection. As the collection grew in the now-dubbed Getty Villa, he extended his museum by building another campus. The Villa focuses more on the arts and culture of Greece, Rome, and Etruria, while the Center houses collections from pre-20th-century European paintings, drawings, illuminated manuscripts, sculpture, and decorative arts; and 19th- and 20th-century American, Asian, and European photographs.

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Tourist guide: It is free to get in both museums, but you do need to pay a parking fee. But here’s the good thing: If you want to visit both museums in one day, just keep your parking ticket as it is valid for both museums on a same-day visit. That’s a $15 parking ticket you pay once for a two-museum visit. On Saturdays, the Center closes later as well, so if you don’t want to rush from one place to another, I suggest visiting the Villa first, and then drive on over to the Center.

PS: Audio tours are free, and they loan you the listening device AND the headphones. Now, I’m sure they clean their headphones, but if you’re a tad germophobic like me, feel free to bring your own headset.


Now, I’ve been to the Center a handful of times, and to the Villa zero times. That’s something that needs to be changed. Haha. The reason why I haven’t visited the very beautiful Villa is because I want to view all the collections at the Center. Some exhibits do change which makes multiple trips reasonable.

Once you get out of the parking structure, a tram takes you to the top of the hill where the magnificent structure of the Getty Museum is located. Whenever I step out of that tram, the view never fails to take my breath away. Right in front of the building, you have a wide open area that lets you take in the view from atop that hill. Overlooking the terrace is the valley, the houses and the rolling hills. The facade of the building is simple yet magnanimous. Clear lines, white finish, and a spacious staircase that leads you at the front door. Even before you enter the Center, you are greeted by marvelous sculptures.

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To the right of the front door is the audio tour desk. All you have to do is leave a form of identification with them and they will hand you your free audio tour listening device. I highly recommend this audio tour. There is no set tour you have to follow, you just go to whatever exhibit you want to check out and enter the number you see next to the exhibit piece into the listening device.

Oh, and if you are visiting with children and have a lot of stuff, took public transportation, or just have a lot of belongings with you, don’t let that hinder you from exploring the Center comfortably. To the left of the open-air lobby, you can find a check-in counter for your coats, bags, etc.

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Whenever I visit the Center, I have a little pattern that I follow. Different exhibits are placed in different buildings, a couple are connected to each other by hallways and stairs. I work my way from the exhibits right out front and wok my way back (I follow the map they give out in front). And then I take a break out in the courtyard, have a snack, a drink, get some fresh air, and then resume my tour. I have NEVER completed the exhibits in one day, hence the multiple visits.

When I feel like I’ve satisfied my museum craving, I walk around the expansive and beautiful garden of the Center. After all that, I usually find a shaded area in their grassy area and join the other visitors just chilling on the grass, laying out, doing their think out in the Center garden. Yes, the garden is open to the visitors, even if they visit the Center specifically just to have a picnic there. Outside in the courtyard/garden, you can marvel at the impressive architecture of the Center. Not only that, it offers a wonderful view of the city. I would take this time to just muse on the art pieces that I’ve seen that day. Sometimes, I’d bring my journal or a book with me and just chill the rest of my visit there.

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I’m one of those people that cherish my solitude from time to time. I’m also part of that group who lavishes on alone time in museums. Whenever I go by myself, I really REALLY take my time and check out each art piece. I stand there and admire the art works, ponder on what the artist had in mind, how it makes me feel, what the impact is in today’s society. It’s an experience of the mind and soul that I feel like I cannot undertake if I’m with another person who does not see museums the way that I do. But hey, don’t get me wrong. I enjoy visiting museums with friends because it is also a shared experience. You and your companions get to share your views with each other, discuss about the art work, and simply just share that experience with each other.

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Jaja (IG:@theforevertourist)

Jolibee – Chicago

Happy National Fried Chicken Day everyone!

I’ll admit, I was taken surprise by this day. I was totally off the ball and haven’t been keeping up with the ever important “Foodie Days”. You may think I’m being sarcastic, but I’m actually kind of disappointed in myself! These random days are so light-hearted and fun, they make for decent potluck days, and they sometimes make me think outside the box.

And by outside the box, I mean this time I’m referencing a Filipino CHAIN to celebrate.

20161008_150844Enter…. JOLIBEE. For Filipinos, specifically in the Chicagoland area, this was a huge freaking deal when the ‘bee first arrived. I’m talking, Six Flags-style lines, Black Friday-esque impatience… ya’ll really wanted your Chickenjoy.

And if you didn’t catch what I said, this is a CHAIN. With that said, I will drive the 30 minutes, passing yellow archs, crowns, and ivory towers to get my fix. At first, I was such a hater – mainly because I hate crowds and for the first several months, that’s all I saw when passing by. But now that the hype has died down, I managed to finally get my order in. Let’s focus on the chicken – I love fried chicken, and they’re doing it and doing it and doing it well.

And in case you haven’t gone in yourself, make sure to pick up their *peach mango pie* too. Better yet, get yourself like, 5. And hide that stash from your kids because they WILL steal them. And you will regret the things you say & do to your kids for being innocently drawn to sweet, sugary, beautiful things.

Wanderlust Wednesday: Washington, D.C. (Part 2)

We tackled a lot in the few days that we were here, which is why this segment is broken down into parts.

The first monument we come across is the Washington Monument.  Usually it would be open for the public to climb up to the top, but it was closed when we had gotten there.  It was still beautiful to see.

We were hoping to see the cherry blossoms, but they had bloomed early and only a few trees still had their flowers.  We were lucky to come across one and it was beautiful!

Our first stop was the Thomas Jefferson Memorial.  Built for one of America’s Founding Fathers, who also drafted one of the most important documents in our county’s history – The Declaration of Independence.

At first, it looks clean, and simple, but when you walk inside, there is a statue of Thomas Jefferson in bronze.

Along the walls, there are excerpts from various works that he wrote.

From there, we continued our walk towards the Lincoln Memorial.  On the way, we came across the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial.

Freedom of Speech/ Freedom of Worship/ Freedom From Want/ Freedom From Fear

The architechs behind the memorial wanted it to be accessible to those with disabilities (FDR was in a wheelchair). This relief has braille for those who are sight-impaired.

There are four different sections, each signifying his four terms as President of the United States.  He is the only President to have four terms, when the previous Presidents followed George Washington’s precedent by only having two terms, and before the enactment of the 22nd Amendment that limited the President to two terms in office.

Since I have family members who have served in the military and in at least two wars, I had to also visit a few of the war memorials (it was only right).

The World War II Memorial

Korean War Veterans Memorial

Vietnam Veterans Memorial

The Three Servicemen
The Memorial Wall

We also had a chance to see the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial.

Proof of Life!

Last but not least (for today), the Lincoln Memorial.  Its one thing to see this on TV, but its another to be standing within it’s walls.

When looking out onto the reflection pool, I couldn’t help but to think of Jenny in that scene from Forrest Gump where she runs across the water to hug him.

Overall, this was a very long walk! We were not kidding around when I said that we were seeing alot!

Next time, we talk about some of the museums we went to, The State Capital and, of course, The White House!












Supper Club Saturday: Bad Saint

Bad Saint

3226 11th St NW,
Washington, DC 20010

Even though our visit to Washington D.C. was going to be short, I did not want to pass up the opportunity to enjoy one of the top restaurants in the area (the question was which one?)  Well, Bad Saint was literally steps from where we were staying, so it would be foolhardy to pass up this opportunity.

Bad Saint is a Filipino Restaurant with limited seating and they take no reservations.  It is usually advised to come an hour or more before opening.

The Line for Bad Saint Before Opening

Having been raised by my Filipino Mom and having grown up on Filipino cuisine, why would I wait in line for something so familiar?  Even though it may be the same recipe, the dish will vary in flavor/style from island to island, and even from family to family.

I just wanted to see how their “house” recipes compare and contrast to ours.

What is Filipino food exactly?  There isn’t a concrete answer to that, and opinions differ from person to person, depending on who you ask.  The best answer I have from what I know of Filipino food is that it is a mix of a lot of things: Spanish, a variety of Asian influences (Chinese, Japanese and Korean, for example) and Indonesian, to name a few.  There is not a lot of sweet, but sour and salty.  There are dishes that are light and others that are heavy and comforting.

Yeah, the food is pretty diverse.

When they had opened, there was already a big party at the head of the line.  I believe the largest table they had sits 4 or 6 people. The line moved quickly and we advanced a few feet.  Already they were at capacity.  They were taking names and phone numbers so they could text you when a table is ready.

I came prepared for this already. I wasn’t too hungry yet and already planned to head back to our place to wait my turn.  I expected at least an hour and a half wait.

Then the Hostess announced that they had one seat available and asked if anyone was dining solo.  Hey, that would be me!

I raised my hand so high and fast, that I was literally standing on my toes.  The Hostess gestured to me and I followed her in.
Yeah, maybe it looked sad that I was eating alone, but I was far from being sad – I was happy that I did not have to wait over an hour to eat here after all!

I was seated along the windows on a high seat.  The bar ledge was edged with Mahjong tiles, and I was immediately reminded of the late nights with my Uncles and Cousins with the sounds of tiles getting “shuffled” on the card table.

Proof of Life (I Loved the Bar Behind Me)

When I was handed the menu, I was advised that the chef changes the selections often.

I may not have been hungry outside, but I was now.  The kitchen was literally behind me and, whatever they were cooking was making my mouth water.

I also accepted the fact that I was going to smell like food after this.

I decided to go with 3 dishes (mostly because I couldn’t make up my mind!)

I started with Kinilaw Na Pugita, which was octopus with fingerling potatoes and sliced Queen Olives in a vinagrette.

The octopus was light and fresh with a citrusy finish

I want to say we had something similar to this but with squid once.  I did like the olives in this version.

Next was Bulalo, a bone marrow stew with corn, carrots, potatoes, cabbage, green chili and a side of a vinegary fish sauce for more seasoning.  I couldn’t resist getting this as I am a fan of this stew!

Even With The Stew, I Couldn’t Forget the Rice!

The stew was delicious and reminded me of how my Mom makes it. In fact, its hard to say, whose is better.

The last dish I tried was Pancit Na Hipon, made with glass noodles, pork belly (mmm pork belly 😍), shrimp and chili.

This Had Some Kick!

Pancit is one of those dishes that takes many forms, usually dependent on the type of noodle.  When my Mom makes pancit, its with a rice noodle.  My aunt makes her with a thicker, almost lo mein style type noodle. With the noodles, you can add any type of protein (ie chicken, pork or shellfish) and sliced vegetables (ie celery, carrots, green onions) and don’t forget the fish sauce!  Having the pancit with the glass noodle was an interesting take. It almost slid in my mouth from the sauce and the pork belly.  The peanuts added crunch and the chilis some heat (even though I asked for it to be mild).   I really did like it.

At the end I was given, what reminded me of Turon, Banana Lumpia with Caramel Sauce.  However, the Hostess called it something else (I think, because it didnt sound like Turon).  The outside was a crispy and flaky egg roll wrapper, coated in a sticky caramel with a ripe and sweet banana inside.  Anyway, it was still good, no matter what it was.

Overall it was a great meal.  I wished I had more room to try the rest.  I definitely would go back if I had another opportunity.

Have you also been to Bad Saint?  How did it go?  Leave your comments below!


Photowalk: Venice Beach at Night


In my previous post, I shared a video montage of Venice Beach in the daytime. One of my favorite beaches, Venice Beach is home to a diversity of people and culture. The walls are filled with color, the people all beautiful in their own ways, the streets crowded with the hustle and bustle of vendors, tourists, and residents alike. Music is usually heard in the background, from the stalls that line the boardwalk or from street performers trying to get you attention.

But Venice Beach at night? It is a whole different world when the sun goes down.


The streets that are usually filled by people are empty, with a few stragglers here and there. Shops and restaurants are closed, lacking in color and life. The boardwalk is illuminated only be street lamps that keep people from hiding in entire darkness. Occasionally, a cop car would drive past, keeping peace and quiet at bay for everyone.


The exact night I went to Venice Beach with my friend MB, California had legalized weed. So you bet yourself supporters are low-key celebrating themselves that night. At one point, I had walked past a group of teenage kids with a cardboard sign that read “We need Weed.”


If you’ve frequented Venice Beach as much as I had, being in that same place at night time is an eerily interesting concept. You know what you should expect, yet your senses are warning you that there is something lacking: the life, the vibe, the soul that keeps Venice Beach alive.


MB and I walked up and down the street that separated the buildings from the beach. We found interesting alley ways and took a gander to see what we’d find. We walked past one restroom building and overheard a few men about to start a fight, one side provoking the other. When the cop rolled past, every one was forced to keep their cool. But other than that, everyone just minded their own business. A couple of late night musicians still played music into the night, a handful of couples walking hand in hand maybe trying to walk off the dinner and drinks they just had.


While I am not going to suggest one explores Venice Beach at night by themselves, I do encourage seeing it at night, bring a few friends, make an adventure out of it. Even though you know it’s the same Venice Beach, the stark contract between night and day is very much noticeable.


Happy Summer everyone!


Jaja, the forever tourist (IG: @theforevertourist, #theforevertourist)